Erik-Maltais-CEO-of-Immertec
Health

How Virtual Reality Is Increasing Accessibility to Healthcare

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How Virtual Reality Is Increasing Accessibility to Healthcare

Access to healthcare is becoming more difficult as more people migrate away from cities to live in more rural areas, either because of the pandemic or because they want to ease their daily routines. Healthcare is a critical need, but for many people who live far from clinics, medical experts, and other professionals, it can be a complicated issue.

Erik Maltais, a MedTech entrepreneur, recognised all of these conflicting influences and, motivated by a desire to do good in the world of technology, used Virtual Reality (VR) technology to make healthcare specialists available to everyone.

Virtual reality (VR) devices are currently thought of as entertainment platforms that can be used to watch movies, play video games, and even immerse oneself in the digital non-traditional retail industry. Maltais, on the other hand, saw a connection between virtual reality and medicine and used his entrepreneurial spirit to help it transform the healthcare industry.

Within three years of their initial concept, Maltais and his partner Jon Clagg had created VR software that was more than just for fun, but also had societal implications. Maltais and Clagg formed their award-winning company, Immertec, with a newfound emphasis on the medical training industry.

Leading the Charge in Medical Technology Innovation
Maltais is paving the way in a field of medicine where experts believe there is a lot of room for development. Virtual reality, according to medical experts at Cedars-Sinai, is a new frontier in medical innovation. It makes it easier for doctors to learn necessary procedures, increases empathy among healthcare providers, which leads to faster patient advancement, and helps by providing at-risk people with hands-on disease education.

Virtual reality allows people to have a firsthand view of almost everything. Years of training are required when applying this technology to medicine, both for the practitioner’s and the patient’s protection. However, once you’ve been taught, the possibilities are endless. Maltais’ scheme gives healthcare workers another opportunity to exercise their expertise in order to be prepared in an emergency.

Increasing Accessibility to Specialized Procedures
Immertec is a virtual reality platform that allows surgeons and medical professionals to observe, interact, and collaborate in real-time. Cameras are mounted in an operating room using Immertec’s specialized technology known as Medoptic, and doctors can put on a VR headset and watch a surgical operation taking place from anywhere in the room; it also allows them to talk with one another and zoom in closer to the surgical site if they wish.

Maltais established the business because it had the ability to decentralise specialisation. Virtual reality makes the latest cutting-edge procedures and techniques more available. As a result, more doctors will be exposed to surgical advances, providing greater access to medical advancements that are not limited by geography.

Immertec’s network lag time is less than 500 milliseconds, giving it an advantage over its rivals that depend on simulations for training. All takes place in real time, which is critical in this line of work because a pause could create a major communication barrier in a high-stakes situation.

Immertec initiated a pilot programme with one of the top three medical device firms in the world in 2019, giving 3,000 doctors access to the company’s technology. They’re on their way to revolutionising the industry.

People-Centered Technology Advances
Maltais credits his company’s success to the people behind the technology’s work ethic. They’re inspired by the shocking statistic that more than 60% of Americans lack fair access to trauma level one and level two treatment. Immertech’s creativity is driven by the fact that the company was established to address a critical need: a shortage of advanced healthcare access.

Maltais argues that a human need lies at the heart of every technological innovation. People must be able to use the technology, it must fulfil a major need in society, and people must be able to sustain it in order for it to continue to expand and evolve.

Maltias’ ingenuity is demonstrating to many in the tech industry how programmes and systems created for entertainment or fun can be optimised as solutions for human-centered issues, even high-stakes ones like healthcare. Virtual reality started out as a fun toy for gamers and techies, but now innovators like Maltias are moving it into the medical realm.

When considering how their ideas will benefit the common good, entrepreneurs can take inspiration from this imagination.


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